Full-frontal nude ankles are just too much for average Asian man

A newlywed bride on honeymoon put on her sexiest clothes. Her husband reacted in the obvious way – he went home and filed for divorce, alleging “mental cruelty.” Huh? It may seem illogical, but remember: this is Asia.

At a court in New Delhi, the man’s lawyer told district judge Manmohan Sharma: “During their honeymoon, she dressed herself in a very vulgar manner.” Shocked, the judge granted the divorce at once, visions of full-frontal nude ankles scandalizing his imagination.

I shared this recent news item at an international business conference the other day. Western executives were amazed. “If Asian women want to inflict this type of mental cruelty on you, send them to us,” they said. “We’ll suffer on your behalf.”

But reflecting on this issue later, I realized that we Asians better face the hard truth about ourselves. Deep down, many of us don’t like sex. Our region is ALWAYS last in the Durex global survey of sexual well-being.

Last month, the Mainichi Daily News reported that more than a third of Japanese boys aged 16 to 19 and 59 percent of girls of the same age were “indifferent or averse” to having sex, according to a survey. David McNeill, a journalist working in Japan, was amazed. “Where I grew up in Ireland, teenagers thought about little else.”

The debate reminded me of a case I once reported on in rural China in which a couple complained that they had no children after five years of marriage. The doctor asked: “How often do you have sex?” The couple replied: “Sex? What’s that?”

http://www.thestandard.com.hk/news_detail.asp?we_cat=5&art_id=109736&sid=31663494&con_type=1&d_str=20110401&fc=7

by The Punjapit Alliance

Posted in 1, Far East Asia, sex, They Said, WTF. Comments Off on Full-frontal nude ankles are just too much for average Asian man

April Fool’s Day….

April Fools’ Day, sometimes called All Fools’ Day, is one of the most light-hearted days of the year. Its origins are uncertain. Some see it as a celebration related to the turn of the seasons, while others believe it stems from the adoption of a new calendar.

New Year’s Day Moves

Ancient cultures, including those of the Romans and Hindus, celebrated New Year’s Day on or around April 1. It closely follows the vernal equinox (March 20th or March 21st.) In medieval times, much of Europe celebrated March 25, the Feast of Annunciation, as the beginning of the new year.

In 1582, Pope Gregory XIII ordered a new calendar (the Gregorian Calendar) to replace the old Julian Calendar. The new calendar called for New Year’s Day to be celebrated Jan. 1. That year, France adopted the reformed calendar and shifted New Year’s day to Jan. 1. According to a popular explanation, many people either refused to accept the new date, or did not learn about it, and continued to celebrate New Year’s Day on April 1. Other people began to make fun of these traditionalists, sending them on “fool’s errands” or trying to trick them into believing something false. Eventually, the practice spread throughout Europe.

Problems With This Explanation

There are at least two difficulties with this explanation. The first is that it doesn’t fully account for the spread of April Fools’ Day to other European countries. The Gregorian calendar was not adopted by England until 1752, for example, but April Fools’ Day was already well established there by that point. The second is that we have no direct historical evidence for this explanation, only conjecture, and that conjecture appears to have been made more recently.

Constantine and Kugel

Another explanation of the origins of April Fools’ Day was provided by Joseph Boskin, a professor of history at Boston University. He explained that the practice began during the reign of Constantine, when a group of court jesters and fools told the Roman emperor that they could do a better job of running the empire. Constantine, amused, allowed a jester named Kugel to be king for one day. Kugel passed an edict calling for absurdity on that day, and the custom became an annual event.

“In a way,” explained Prof. Boskin, “it was a very serious day. In those times fools were really wise men. It was the role of jesters to put things in perspective with humor.”

This explanation was brought to the public’s attention in an Associated Press article printed by many newspapers in 1983. There was only one catch: Boskin made the whole thing up. It took a couple of weeks for the AP to realize that they’d been victims of an April Fools’ joke themselves.

Spring Fever

It is worth noting that many different cultures have had days of foolishness around the start of April, give or take a couple of weeks. The Romans had a festival named Hilaria on March 25, rejoicing in the resurrection of Attis. The Hindu calendar has Holi, and the Jewish calendar has Purim. Perhaps there’s something about the time of year, with its turn from winter to spring, that lends itself to lighthearted celebrations.

Observances Around the World

April Fools’ Day is observed throughout the Western world. Practices include sending someone on a “fool’s errand,” looking for things that don’t exist; playing pranks; and trying to get people to believe ridiculous things.

The French call April 1 Poisson d’Avril, or “April Fish.” French children sometimes tape a picture of a fish on the back of their schoolmates, crying “Poisson d’Avril” when the prank is discovered.

http://www.infoplease.com/spot/aprilfools1.html

by The Punjapit Alliance

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Arnold Schwarzenegger and Boris Johnson riding bikes together

This could be the best thing to happen anywhere, ever. Boris Johnson, King Of The Gaffs, meeting Arnold Schwarzenegger, King Of Cracking Skulls. Or it could be just two middle-aged men on Boris Bikes… One of whom happens to be the most charismatic politicians ever known, the other, Arnold Schwarzenegger.

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Read more: http://www.asylum.co.uk/2011/03/31/Arnold-Schwarzenegger-boris-johnson-arnie-boris-bikes-video/#ixzz1ICzJiuBl

by The Punjapit Alliance

Posted in 1, Art, They Said, WTF. Comments Off on Arnold Schwarzenegger and Boris Johnson riding bikes together

Sexy Bitch 2

Shanghai still has a way-to-go when it comes to Womens Fashion.

New York, Paris and Milan still rule….

via: http://www.shanghaistylefile.com/?p=1283

by Arf the Dog

Posted in 1, Arf the Dog, Far East Asia, sex. Comments Off on Sexy Bitch 2

It’s Confirmed: Heathrow Worse Than Calcutta


Complaints about Heathrow have pushed the country’s leading airport to 99th in a global table of passenger satisfaction – behind even Calcutta.
Travellers were so fed up at long security queues and poor ‘ambience’, they ranked it far down the league of 146 leading airports.
Confidential data revealed it also lags behind Johannesburg, Athens, Amsterdam Schipol and even Humberside Airport.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1371471/Heathrow-rated-99th-airports-world-table-worse-Calcutta.html#ixzz1I8ts2wJK

by The Punjapit Alliance

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Taylor Mali on “What Teachers Make”

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spotted at Scientopia : http://scientopia.org/blogs/ethicsandscience/2011/03/30/random-youtubery-on-what-teachers-make/

by The Punjapit Alliance

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Relighting Harbin’s history

The Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival, in Harbin, China. (Reuters)

The 27th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in this north-eastern Chinese city is the biggest ever, an incredible demonstration of the same industrial-scale creativity that was on display at the opening ceremony of the Beijing Olympics. The riverfront and streets are lined with hundreds of intricate ice sculptures, including a full-size replica of a Disney castle. At night, lit by multi-coloured lasers and lanterns, the effect is magical.

This year’s festival also sees Harbin reclaim its past, via a frozen re-creation of the St Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church. A legacy of the time before World War II when the city was home to 100,000 Russians, the church was destroyed in 1966 during the Cultural Revolution. ‘For my parents’ generation, that sculpture brings back many memories,’ says Zhang Qingying, a local lawyer.

More than a million visitors are expected to attend this year’s festival, as Harbin establishes itself as China’s winter-sports playground. The nearby ski resort of Yabuli, the country’s biggest, is being upgraded and extended, a sign of how China’s burgeoning middle classes are increasingly taking to the slopes, while rumour has it that Harbin is a frontrunner to host the 2022 Winter Olympics.

David Eimer is the co-author of Lonely Planet’s China guide and the Beijing City Guide. He lives and works in Beijing.

via: http://www.bbc.com/travel/blog/20110303-relighting-harbins-history

by remora + aniie

Posted in 1, A + E, Art, Far East Asia, They Said. Comments Off on Relighting Harbin’s history